Winters tend to run long in a state where snow starts flying in September and doesn’t quit until May. It’s easy to fantasize about summer vacations or beaches in Mexico. But even covered in a blanket of white, Wyoming has something to cure your cabin fever. If you’re not sure where to start, or you’re looking for a little inspiration, we compiled an easy cheat sheet of outdoor weekend adventures. Think of them as the Goldilocks of getaways – something for a shoe-string budget, middle-of-the-road comfort and a bit of a splurge. At these places, the fact that it’s snowing only makes it better.

Do it yourself

Need to escape but living paycheck to paycheck? These places have you covered. You bring food, linens and other basic necessities, and they provide stoves, beds and a roof over your head. Most are also stocked with basic cooking supplies. Take a few friends along to cut costs even more.

Evanston yurts: The Bear River Outdoor Recreation Alliance has a series of five yurts on ski and snowshoe trails at varying distances from your car. They sleep groups of eight or less, depending on the yurt. Ski or snowshoe in, then use the yurt as a home base to explore the mountains of southwest Wyoming. Reservations are required, so check it out early. $75. 307-789-1770, brorayurts.org

Forest Service cabins: Spread throughout Wyoming’s national forests, from the Snowy Range to the Bighorns to the Wyoming Range, are more than a dozen cabins owned and operated by the National Forest Service. Prices and facilities vary widely from one-room cabins with bunk beds to three-room houses with double beds and ovens. Look under the recreation and camping tabs of each forest’s website for specific information. $40-$180, depending on size. fs.fed.us

Stay and play

Attached to many of Wyoming’s ski resorts are lodges offering deals to stay and play. Check in for a few nights and hop on a chair lift only a short walk away. Also consider one of the many family-owned lodges scattered throughout the state where cross-country skiing, snowmobiling and snowshoeing is a step out the front door.

White Pine Ski Resort: Snuggle in front of a fireplace after a long day on the slopes in these two-bedroom cabins. Each cabin outside Pinedale can sleep up to six, with a three-night minimum. $250-275. www.whitepineski.com

Crooked Creek Guest Ranch: Walk out your front door in the morning and hop on a snowmobile at this getaway on Union Pass outside Dubois. Each cabin has a kitchen, but the ranch also offers a full-service restaurant. $125-$400 for cabins that sleep between 4 and 12. 888-238-2647, crookedcreek-gr.com

Be pampered

Get away, and treat yourself. Stay in a cabin or lodge so remote you forget all of your daily stresses. The only way to get there is over snow, and they feed and care for you while you’re there.

Wyoming High Country Lodge: Stay in one of nine cabins or rooms in this winter getaway that has several years of TripAdvisor certificates of excellence. Prices include all of your meals. The lodge is about 45 minutes east of Lovell in the Bighorn Mountains. Ride your snowmobile in, or have the lodge pick you up. $90-100 per person. 307-529-0914, www.wyhighcountry.com

Yellowstone: For the ultimate getaway, take a snow coach into Old Faithful Snow Lodge and immerse yourself in the quiet beauty of Wyoming’s first national park. The lodge offers all-inclusive winter packages that can run up to $2,000 a person for four days of lodging, transportation, food and rentals. Or stay a couple nights for $151-325 a night. A snow coach from Mammoth to Old Faithful is $123 per adult. www.yellowstonenationalparklodges.com

Follow managing editor Christine Peterson on Twitter @PetersonOutside

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A Casper native, Christine Peterson started as a Star-Tribune intern in 2002. She has covered outdoor recreation, the environment and wildlife since 2010, and became managing editor in 2015. If not tracking bears or elk on assignment, she's chasing trout.

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