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Tony Cercy

Tony Cercy, former owner of Power Service Inc., poses for a portrait last year. He was booked into jail Friday on suspicion of sexual assault.

File, Star-Tribune

Local businessman Tony Cercy was booked into the Natrona County Detention Center on Friday afternoon on suspicion of three sexual assault charges.

According to the jail’s phone system, he was booked on two counts of second-degree sexual assault and one count of third-degree sexual assault. It was unclear whether a bond amount had been set for the charges.

His son, Cole Cercy, said Friday afternoon that he had no comment. He did confirm his father had been arrested.

A merchant on the 800 block of Old Yellowstone Highway said he saw Cercy being arrested Friday afternoon by what he described as roughly 20 agents with the Wyoming Division of Criminal Investigation. The merchant, who asked to remain anonymous, said the arrest took place at about 2:30 p.m.

Tony Cercy sold his manufacturing company, Power Service Inc., in April 2016 for an undisclosed sum. He has since made several large purchases and donations. He helped his son buy the Wonder Bar and Poor Boys Steakhouse in the fall. He also donated $1 million to the David Street Station downtown plaza as well as $500,000 to Natrona County High School for a new digital scoreboard.

The Cercys also made recent donations to the University of Wyoming as well as the Casper YMCA.

Gov. Matt Mead toured the Wonder Bar with Cole Cercy on Friday, according to a photo posted at noon to the family business’ Instagram account.

Cercy spoke at a city council meeting after a tumultuous few weeks surrounding the dismissal of former police Chief Jim Wetzel. He asked for calm and said all the drama was making it hard for him and others to do business and would dissuade potential investors.

Cercy started in the sales and parts department at Power Service Inc. in 1982. He took over the company and its 32 employees in 2003. By 2014, at the height of the boom, it employed more than 500 people. Annual revenues surged from $16 million to $270 million over that time, according to previous Star-Tribune reporting.

Follow crime and courts reporter Elise Schmelzer on Twitter @eliseschmelzer

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