Trump FBI

President Donald Trump sits with Attorney General Jeff Sessions during the FBI National Academy graduation ceremony in Virginia last month. Wyoming Congressman Liz Cheney has joined Trump and several other Republican lawmakers in attacking the agency.

AP

Wyoming Congressman Liz Cheney wants the FBI investigated over an alleged bias against President Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential election.

Cheney, a Republican, referred to what she called “real abuses seen by the FBI” during the campaign in an interview with the Wyoming Tribune Eagle last week.

“I think there are serious questions that have been raised about the nation’s law enforcement,” Cheney said in the interview. “I support the idea we’ve got to have an investigation to understand what kind of investigation the FBI was conducting.”

Cheney has joined a chorus of Republican politicians, including Trump himself, who have sought to undermine the credibility of the FBI as the agency’s investigation into Russian interference in the presidential election drags on.

Trump unleashed a blistering attack on the bureau’s leadership in December, denouncing the organization for its handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, calling it “really disgraceful.”

“It’s a shame what’s happened with the FBI,” the president said. “We’re going to rebuild the FBI, it’ll be bigger and better than ever, but it is very sad when you look at those documents, and how they’ve done that is really, really disgraceful, and you have a lot of very angry people that are seeing it.”

The president’s broadside appeared to reflect his anger over revelations that senior FBI officials exchanged anti-Trump and pro-Hillary Clinton text messages while working on last year’s Clinton probe and during special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether Trump associates colluded with Russian officials in the 2016 election.

Cheney spokeswoman Maddy Weast cited those text messages as well as recent revelations that the bureau sought to corroborate a dossier of memos written by former British spy Christopher Steele during the 2016 campaign that contained allegations of connections between Trump and Russia, including that Trump had been compromised by the Kremlin.

Weast cited “the possibility that the bureau used campaign propaganda funded by the Clinton campaign to secure a warrant for surveillance on the Trump campaign.”

Several Republican lawmakers have suggested in recent months that the FBI used the Steele dossier to secure a warrant under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act to spy on Trump campaign officials.

However, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has dismissed that theory, declining in November to appoint a special counsel to investigate the issue.

Weast also specifically referred to text messages sent by FBI agent Peter Strzok to bureau lawyer Lisa Page in which the duo used words like “idiot” and “loathsome human” to describe Trump during the campaign.

The dossier was initially funded by a conservative news website during the presidential primary but payment was taken over by Democrats once Trump became the presumptive nominee.

“Though the vast majority of FBI officials are honorable professionals, in the last several months we have learned about troubling examples of misconduct by senior FBI officials during the 2016 presidential campaign,” Weast wrote in the email. “These are serious allegations that must be investigated.”

Weast did not respond to a question about how Cheney would like the FBI to be investigated or whether the congressman was concerned about undermining the nation’s top law enforcement agency.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

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State Politics Reporter

Arno Rosenfeld covers state politics including the Legislature and Wyoming’s D.C. delegation, focusing especially on the major issues facing the Cowboy State like economic diversification and what it means to be the most conservative state in the nation.

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