Wolves

Proposed wolf hunting quotas in Wyoming nearly double

Estimate: 179 wolves roamed trophy area
2014-05-05T08:00:00Z 2014-05-07T10:28:05Z Proposed wolf hunting quotas in Wyoming nearly doubleBy CHRISTINE PETERSON Star-Tribune staff writer Casper Star-Tribune Online

This fall, hunters in Wyoming may be able to shoot almost twice as many wolves as they could in 2013, according to proposed regulations by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department.

Proposed hunting quotas would allow 43 wolves to be hunted in the trophy game area, 17 more than in 2013, but still less than the 2012 harvest of 52 wolves.

“Our quotas are based adaptively on where the wolf population is at, and we ended up with more wolves than we thought this year,” said Dan Thompson, large carnivore section supervisor for the department. “We’re managing for the same number as last year, but we’re increasing quotas because we had more wolves at the end of the year.”

Game and Fish officials estimated that about 160 wolves would be in Wyoming’s trophy hunting area, which is roughly the northwest corner of the state outside Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks and the Wind River Indian Reservation.

Estimates from December placed the number of wolves roaming the trophy area at 179, he said.

Thompson credits the rise in the wolf population to greater restraint by agencies in hunting and killing wolves, and to a rise in the number of pups born.

“If you have a population that is growing or at carrying capacity and you remove individuals ... they respond by producing more pups,” he said.

Increased quotas are the only changes to wolf regulations this year. No hunting area boundaries or hunting dates will be changed. Wolves in Wyoming and outside the trophy hunt area can still be shot on sight.

Lawsuits are pending in Wyoming and Washington D.C. over Wyoming’s hunting regulations. A decision from a federal judge in Washington D.C. is pending, according to the Associated Press.

The department is holding public meetings across the state about the new quotas. The Game and Fish Commission will vote on the changes during its meeting in July in Dubois.

Reach Assistant Content Director Christine Peterson at 307-746-3121 or christine.peterson@trib.com. Follow her on Twitter @PetersonOutside.

 

 

Copyright 2015 Casper Star-Tribune Online. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

(42) Comments

  1. Flock Ewe
    Report Abuse
    Flock Ewe - June 01, 2014 3:35 pm
    Elk, deer and moose don't feel pain? They don't grieve? Don't you understand that these animals are terrified of the wolf? Who advocates for them? What kind of sick people are you? Only concerned about this merciless killing machine. Did you love the Einsatgruppen too? What about the wolves victims? You think they want to die for a mangy wolf? You think it feels good to them to be disemboweled? Have you not seen the Yellowstone elk trembling in fear? What a country.
  2. Flock Ewe
    Report Abuse
    Flock Ewe - June 01, 2014 2:57 pm
    Good Deal! Let's kill all the Canadian Timber wolves! They are not the subspecies of wolf that originally inhabited Wyoming. This introduction should have been illegal according to the endangered species act. Viva Caniscide!!
  3. reality22
    Report Abuse
    reality22 - May 12, 2014 9:19 pm
    My god made wolves to keep game herds in check in the absence of MAN..... My god will look down on the one that lets the butcher do their dirty work...and are hypocritical to those that enjoy the utmost challenge of perusing our wild organic renewable resources. My god will be more upset with the people that pimped wolves to the point where 2300 Domestic animals were killed and maimed by wolves in Wisconsin and Michigan since there return to the state... and that is just the documented ones ..... then has the audacity to tell others about "killing and hurting" . Same on the people that pimp wolves!
  4. reality22
    Report Abuse
    reality22 - May 12, 2014 9:12 pm
    Funny how what we know about history of Native Americans AND WOLVES don't match what is coming out of the mouths of the tribal leaders (and wolfermom) these days.

    There were an estimated 10 Million PLUS Native Americans living here when "white man" arrived. It is estimated that 9 in 10 perished well before white man started "taking their land" because Native Americans did not have immunity to certain diseases that were brought with Europeans. Here is what we know about those 10 million people..... These are facts related to Native Americans “living in harmony” with wolves.

    * Early Shipping manifest for return trips to Europe show young wolf pelts from dug up dens along with hibernating bears as being common place.

    * Excavation of discard pits from early Native Americans shows ratios averaging 65 prey 35 predator bones.

    * Native American lived with dogs as pets...Anyone with any knowledge of an outdoor people living with wolves in the way Indians would be absurd. Without a doubt, an outdoor people WOULD NOT live in harmony with wolves & have Canis Lupus familiaris, pets

    * Letharia vulpina – wolf poison - goes back to AT LEAST 1759 & was believed to have been used by and originated with Natives to kill wolves and foxes (predators) by stuffing dead animals with this lichen…

    * Young Apache Native Americans would kill wolves, cougars or bears as a rite of passage to adulthood.

    Please by all means do some fact checking.....Wikipedia will at least give you a reference (place to start) for some of these items if you would like to look them up as to their truth/fact worthiness. (Look up the references (footnotes) in Wikipedia – Wikipedia is not fact). I believe the tribes lived in harmony with wildlife....BUT not in the manner they would want us all to believe. Killing wolves is an inevitability they (tribal leaders) cannot escape.
  5. reality22
    Report Abuse
    reality22 - May 12, 2014 9:07 pm
    The only state of the environment that some are interested in is the predator pit which is on the far end of "healthy" ...... Ecologist like Emma Marris that include MAN as part of any eco-system are on the right track. I encourage everyone to read her book "rambunctious gardens" where she talks about designing eco-systems to the needs of people.... there is a wide range of "healthy" in our wild places. The predator pit is certainly not the future of our environment and a huge waste of our renewable organic natural resources.
  6. Wyopoke
    Report Abuse
    Wyopoke - May 07, 2014 6:00 pm
    You "have" a wolf?
  7. Gary H
    Report Abuse
    Gary H - May 06, 2014 9:13 pm
    The northern Yellowstone elk herd has been reduced since the return of wolves, however, wolves along with the increase of grizzly bears and habitat degradation due to a warming climate are among other reasons for the decline. The herd is healthy and at carrying capacity.

    If you look at the Lolo Pass area you will see a rather sharp decline in the elk population before wolves were reintroduced. The area burned in the 1910 fires and as the area became more forested with less forage for elk, their numbers naturally declined.

    I do not deny that wolves have had an impact on elk (80% of their prey base). As I stated elk lost to wolves tend to be compensatory resulting in a more healthy gene pool. Although they will occasionally kill healthy elk, they cannot afford to be injured or lose wasted energy on the more healthy animals.

    Conversely, hunters tend to take the biggest and more healthy animals, resulting in a additive loss (killed later than sooner) reducing the overall health of the herd.

    I know there are areas where licenses have been reduced, however overall elk hunting success in Wyoming last year was near a record rate. It may mean hunting in other areas of the state. According to IDFG and MFWP the majority of elk herds in Montana and Idaho are stable and where they are not, habitat degadation along with predation are the leading causes. Its easy to gun down wolves, its harder to restore habitat. Nothing good in life comes easy.
  8. LWing
    Report Abuse
    LWing - May 06, 2014 8:07 pm
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysa5OBhXz-Q
    Intresting film...check it out..hope it helps!!!
  9. LWing
    Report Abuse
    LWing - May 06, 2014 7:48 pm
    FYI-I live in Wyoming(one of the 'wolf-unfriendly'states, sadly), and I am one of many that live here that think this is not a good idea. Public land is mine too. I pay taxes.I am not going to invest hard‐earned tax dollars so these animals can be treated like vermin and killed on sight. So lets work together for a solution. Killing on site is not conservation. We do have a very successful wolf management plan in north-central Wyoming. It is the Arapaho Ranch and it is the largest USDA certified organic ranch in the United States. It is a living, breathing, working example of how to ranch in a truly sustainable way, in harmony with the surrounding environment, and still make a living. And many other ranches and farms across the United States are doing just the same. They are practicing such obvious things as fladry, range riders,well trained dogs, cleaning up their 'kill piles', etc.Its called co-existing….!! The wolf population is vital to the ecosystem.
  10. Kool Kat
    Report Abuse
    Kool Kat - May 06, 2014 7:09 pm
    Attn wolfermom, not if they're wolf pups, I wouldn't either.
  11. wolfermom
    Report Abuse
    wolfermom - May 06, 2014 7:02 pm
    The Native Americans were a lot better at living with animals and land. They had it right and still do.
  12. wolfermom
    Report Abuse
    wolfermom - May 06, 2014 6:57 pm
    Yes where is it.
  13. wolfermom
    Report Abuse
    wolfermom - May 06, 2014 6:56 pm
    I would not want my children around you.
  14. RedsKen
    Report Abuse
    RedsKen - May 06, 2014 6:53 pm
    I swear the only people that do/did "get it".Native Americans.Everything and I mean Everything lived along side each other on this land for hundred's & hundreds of years never taxing Mother Earth or anything she put upon here..Why.. Respect for this land and all upon it..at one time there was a cure(plant-mineral-etc)for any man born disease/illness's...When the Spaniards/ White Man reared their ugly heads..That was the start of the world as we know it now.Take all and kill those in the way of what they want..Wolves do not kill just kill...Only man does..and only man is responsible for what shape the world is in...Over Grazing Land - Pollution - Extinction of Anything -Killing/War....It's Us it's Us
  15. wolfermom
    Report Abuse
    wolfermom - May 06, 2014 6:52 pm
    I do not believe in killing a animal of any kind. And yes I do know wolves can be mean, I have one and she protects us and is part of our family. I have see the wild side of her and the loving side. God made all animals for a reason and put us over them, not to kill and hurt them in any way, but to care for them with love. I do not want to face my Lord and say [ oh I did it for fun ].
  16. Triple BB
    Report Abuse
    Triple BB - May 06, 2014 2:05 pm
    What a bunch of garbage! Elk hunting success and populations are doing well in those areas of the state where you don't find wolves. Many area's in the NW corner of the state have been obliterated by wolves. As a result a number of general license areas and seasons have been changed due to a lack of animals. The Yellowstone elk herds have dropped by almost 50% since wolves were introduced in 1995. The same is going on in Idaho and Montana. Idaho has it far worse than Wyoming with elk numbers almost being wiped out in some areas like the Lolo zone. Its pathetic how you people spin and distort facts when it comes to wolves...
  17. Jeff Wilson
    Report Abuse
    Jeff Wilson - May 06, 2014 12:12 pm
    I'm just going to reiterate what Gary H. said since he said it so eloquently. Facts are facts. This is Science class 101. The negative comments here come from places devoid of knowledge and science. Sorry folks but you are just plain wrong.

    Ecosystems function best when top predators (wolves, bears, mountain lions, coyotes) are able to roam the landscape and yes prey on ungulates, rodents and other predators. Predators mainly prey on the sick, old, lame and sometimes on the young and their losses are mainly compensatory in that these animals would have died sooner than later. If given the chance, wolves will self regulate as the leading cause of wolf death in Yellowstone is from other wolves. Bears kill other bears, mountain lions kill other lions and so on.

    As for predation on livestock, wolves account for less than 1% of livestock deaths in the west with dogs accounting for more far more deaths. Do we want to start killing mans best friend (which originated from the wolf).

    Elk hunting success in Wyoming is at record levels and overall elk populations are above recommended numbers.

    Predators are a good indicator for our maturity as a species. When we allow a animal to roam long distances looking for a mate, it says a lot about us, unfortunately Wyoming is not there it.
  18. Gary H
    Report Abuse
    Gary H - May 06, 2014 10:52 am
    Ecosystems function best when top predators (wolves, bears, mountain lions, coyotes) are able to roam the landscape and yes prey on ungulates, rodents and other predators. Predators mainly prey on the sick, old, lame and sometimes on the young and their losses are mainly compensatory in that these animals would have died sooner than later. If given the chance, wolves will self regulate as the leading cause of wolf death in Yellowstone is from other wolves. Bears kill other bears, mountain lions kill other lions and so on.

    As for predation on livestock, wolves account for less than 1% of livestock deaths in the west with dogs accounting for more far more deaths. Do we want to start killing mans best friend (which originated from the wolf).

    Elk hunting success in Wyoming is at record levels and overall elk populations are above recommended numbers.

    Predators are a good indicator for our maturity as a species. When we allow a animal to roam long distances looking for a mate, it says a lot about us, unfortunately Wyoming is not there it.
  19. LVHS77
    Report Abuse
    LVHS77 - May 05, 2014 10:28 pm
    david I hope your post is not a threat.
  20. Wyopoke
    Report Abuse
    Wyopoke - May 05, 2014 10:22 pm
    Hunting and killing animals is the equivalent of child molestation?

    Boy you are one sick puppy (or cub as 99 savage points out)!

    Sickos like you who identify with ANY group give that group an undeserved black eye.....

    Hey all you pro wolf folks here - are you really going to sit in silence while someone who claims to be one of your own makes sick and outrageous equivalencies like this or are you going to man up and take out your own trash????
  21. Wyopoke
    Report Abuse
    Wyopoke - May 05, 2014 10:15 pm
    I agree when it comes to the current president!!
  22. Kool Kat
    Report Abuse
    Kool Kat - May 05, 2014 8:07 pm
    Attn DavidAHereaux, I bought my sissy neighbor a case of bud light for killing 42 wolves just last week. Wolf killing sissies are my heros.
  23. Completely Fed Up
    Report Abuse
    Completely Fed Up - May 05, 2014 7:55 pm
    Humans are worse, and we elect them to the presidency and to congress, and honor them. We laud their hired killers and torturers, cheering madly as the killing machines fly over sporting events.

    By the way, wolves and big game coexisted successfully for millennia until the welfare cowboys decided to eradicate wolves. Left alone, the populations will come into balance, producing healthier populations of big game, although more wary, a concern for guides and their fat, yuppie clients, who will find it harder to find an easy trophy ... and leave the meat to rot.
  24. LVHS77
    Report Abuse
    LVHS77 - May 05, 2014 7:14 pm
    Shoot, shovel and shut up. Too bad wolf lovers care more about murdering canines than innocent preborn human babies
  25. DavidAHereaux
    Report Abuse
    DavidAHereaux - May 05, 2014 7:11 pm
    The time has come to spay and neuter them all in order to control the population.

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21528836.200-animals-are-conscious-and-should-be-treated-as-such.html#.U2g04fnp2h4
  26. 99Savage
    Report Abuse
    99Savage - May 05, 2014 6:37 pm
    Just a technical correction. Wolves can have pups or cubs. Both are correct. The terms are interchangeable for wolves.
  27. Wyopoke
    Report Abuse
    Wyopoke - May 05, 2014 5:21 pm
    Herein lies the problem. Bleeding heart liberal enviro armchair biologists personifying a killing machine.

    They are not cuddly cartoon Disney critters. They are remorseless predators.
  28. Wyopoke
    Report Abuse
    Wyopoke - May 05, 2014 5:17 pm
    Are the wolves ok to kill beautiful elk still?

    The time for petitions has passed. Wolves will be with us from now on with humans as their only predator. Many many elk have and will be sacrificed at the liberal enviro alter of the great government puppy.

    Game and Fish will do a fine job of managing the population through hunting and the wolves will have many pups each year as well.

    By the way wolves have PUPS not CUBS. Whoever that statement in the article is attributed doesn't know a wolf from their left knee - and these are the people who are representative of the wolf advocate population which unfortunately is nowhere close to extinction....
  29. 99Savage
    Report Abuse
    99Savage - May 05, 2014 4:15 pm
    Have you ever witnessed wolves take down an elk for nothing more than the sheer thrill of the kill? Or hamstring their prey and precede to partially consume it while it is still alive and then abandon it while it suffers a horrible lingering death? Or maybe attack a cow elk in the process of calving and eat the calf while the cow is still birthing?

    Yes, these things actually happen yet the wolf advocates seem not to care one whit of the prey's suffering. So if you want to attach a "beauty" to the wolf, an exclusively human emotional response, then should you not also attach empathy and chagrin to the wolf's prey and its horrible and unnecessary prolonged suffering? Aren't elk and moose also magnificent and beautiful? And yet wolves must be more "beautiful" for one to admire them so in spite of their repeated destruction of other "beautiful" animals.

    Don't think too hard about all this as it may give you a headache.
  30. Triple BB
    Report Abuse
    Triple BB - May 05, 2014 4:03 pm
    How'd yer lawsuits in Montana and Idaho work out? Thankfully congress recognized how much this frivolous litigation was costing the American taxpayer. When its said and done, Wyoming will prevail on the pending litigation and we'll continue to properly manage wolves like any other trophy or big game species...
  31. LeAnn
    Report Abuse
    LeAnn - May 05, 2014 3:02 pm
    Where is the petition that I can sign to stop this.. Do not kill any more BEAUTIFUL WOLVES!!!
  32. wildlife advocate
    Report Abuse
    wildlife advocate - May 05, 2014 2:48 pm
    It's hard to understand people that can't wait to' "smoke" a wolf in the fall. I wonder when I see comments like this where does such hate come from? Wolves are social animals, like dogs, but more intelligent. They hunt together, mate for life and rear their young as a group. They generally try and avoid humans. Randomly "smoking"a member of the pack would be like randomly killing a member of a family. How well the other members survive is a question that has many facets. Wolves grieve. After the Yellowstone Lamar female was killed her mate was observed in a state of flux and grief and the pack broke up. You've got to have a stone cold heart to want to kill the animal that most resembles your pet dog and is closest to the dog in DNA. Aside from that comment, managing animals to meet the lowest viable population numbers is shortsighted and bad policy. Less than 300 wolves resided in Wyoming before the state took over management. Contrast that number to hundred of thousands of elk, thousands of cougar and other wild animals and tell me why Wyoming should be so intolerant of some of the most beautiful predators on earth? Wyoming is home to millions of acres of public lands and the majority of Americans that own this public land see these state management policies as a violent, unjustified, inhumane war against wolves. Your states are proving that they have not moved out of the last century and they can't be trusted to manage public trust resources. Its too bad lawsuits are needed to stop the slaughter.
  33. Wyopoke
    Report Abuse
    Wyopoke - May 05, 2014 2:27 pm
    Where do you get these statistics?? HSUS?

    I'm not sure this represents the will if the people. And if it's the "will" of the people outside Wyoming then I'm sorry - my micro-giva-crapometer is in the shop so I cannot tell you precisely how little I care about what they think since they literally have no skin in the game. Furthermore I guarantee you that more than 6% of the Wyoming population hunts and that way more than half the population of adults favor a managed wolf season in the trophy area as well as the definition of wolves as predators outside the trophy zone.

    Hunters and Sportsmen are the ones who fund the "recovery" effort through license fees and conservation stamps.

    Did you buy your conservation stamp in January like I did?
  34. Wyopoke
    Report Abuse
    Wyopoke - May 05, 2014 2:20 pm
    So we are to support welfare puppies instead??
  35. Triple BB
    Report Abuse
    Triple BB - May 05, 2014 2:07 pm
    What's a recovered population? They relocated a bunch of Canadian wolves from point A to point B. Canadian wolves aren't endangered and never have been. If Wyoming starts to run a little low, I'm sure they could import a few more non native wolves into Wyoming.

    Also, where's your data showing the majority of Wyoming resident's oppose wolf hunting? Guess that might be the case if you shrink Wyoming's boundary to the Jackson city limits.

    Here's to hoping I'll get to smoke one this fall...
  36. wyoslick
    Report Abuse
    wyoslick - May 05, 2014 1:40 pm
    Unless you are a wildlife manager, somebody told you, "a population of 160 wolves in the 'trophy area' is a truly recovered population is foolish". Do enviros believe everything they are told?
  37. julierl
    Report Abuse
    julierl - May 05, 2014 1:26 pm
    Accepting Wyoming G&F's statement that a population of 160 wolves in the "trophy area" is a truly recovered population is foolish to say the least. Do sportsmen believe everything they are told? Also, get the sheep and cattle off public lands and there will be much less "conflict" between ranching and wolves. Since a majority of Wyoming residents and American citizens oppose wolf hunting, and only 6% of the population at large hunts, I think the will of the people is clear. Stop the wolf hunts. Re-examine the policy of allowing cheap or free or unpaid grazing of livestock on public land.
  38. average wyomingite
    Report Abuse
    average wyomingite - May 05, 2014 11:28 am
    It should come as no surprise to me but I'm always fascinated how people on blogs are usually far right or far left. On the surface the proposal seems balanced and moderate. Sure they have to appease the Cowboys. But also the hunters. And the environmental community. Those who say kill them all are just as out of touch with reality as those that say don't hunt wolves ever. There are lots of interests to balance here, not the least of which is the law which mandates the G&F manage for a sustainable and recovered population.
  39. wyoslick
    Report Abuse
    wyoslick - May 05, 2014 10:58 am
    Isn't the G & F trying to maintain a population of about a 160 wolves in the trophy area? It's "maintaining a population" the antithesis of "Carnicide"?
  40. Completely Fed Up
    Report Abuse
    Completely Fed Up - May 05, 2014 10:14 am
    Anything to please the welfare cowboys, whose contribution to the state domestic product is less than 1 percent. The biologists know better, but they are ruled by managers who are ruled by the welfare queens.
  41. WyoBob
    Report Abuse
    WyoBob - May 05, 2014 10:11 am
    Wyoming G&F is doing what they committed to do; maintain a recovered wolf population.
    The G&F Commission is doing a great job. Sportsmen knew last years harvest quota was pretty conservative. That is now being reflected by an increase in quota this year.
    It would be great if the courts would finally allow the state wildlife managers to manage our wildlife rather than the courts.
  42. Cody Coyote
    Report Abuse
    Cody Coyote - May 05, 2014 9:40 am
    Wyomng's wolf management is Caniscide.
    No more ; no less.

    What it's not is sound wildlife conservation.
Untitled Document

Civil Dialogue

We provide this community forum for readers to exchange ideas and opinions on the news of the day. Passionate views, pointed criticism and critical thinking are welcome. Name-calling, crude language and personal abuse are not welcome. Moderators will monitor comments with an eye toward maintaining a high level of civility in this forum. Our comment policy explains the rules of the road for registered commenters.

If your comment was not approved, perhaps...

  1. You called someone an idiot, a racist, a dope, a moron, etc. Please, no name-calling or profanity (or veiled profanity -- #$%^&*).

  2. You rambled, failed to stay on topic or exhibited troll-like behavior intended to hijack the discussion at hand.

  3. YOU SHOUTED YOUR COMMENT IN ALL CAPS. This is hard to read and annoys readers.

  4. You have issues with a business. Have a bad meal? Feel you were overcharged at the store? New car is a lemon? Contact the business directly with your customer service concerns.

  5. You believe the newspaper's coverage is unfair. It would be better to write the editor at editors@trib.com, or call Editor Jason Adrians at 266-0545 or Content Director David Mayberry at 266-0633. This is a forum for community discussion, not for media criticism. We'd rather address your concerns directly.

  6. You included an e-mail address or phone number, pretended to be someone you aren't or offered a comment that makes no sense.

  7. You accused someone of a crime or assigned guilt or punishment to someone suspected of a crime.

  8. Your comment is in really poor taste.

Add Comment
You must Login to comment.

Click here to get an account it's free and quick