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Editor: 

When Glendo State Park wanted to develop a trail system, a grant from the Land and Water Conservation Fund made it a reality. When Meeteetse wanted to update its rodeo grounds and Moorcroft wanted to develop a new baseball field and playground, the LWCF provided funds. The town park in my hometown of Dubois has also benefited from multiple LWCF grants that helped with the pedestrian trails and bridge.

When access to public lands at the base of the Big Horn Mountains was cut off by a road closure on a private ranch, the county tried unsuccessfully to reopen the road in court. Later, the ranch went up for sale, creating an opportunity to utilize LWCF and other funding to convert a portion of it to public land and permanently secure access for hunters and recreationists.

The LWCF has helped Wyoming communities develop local parks and recreation facilities, provide access to landlocked public land, and conserve wildlife habitats and open spaces. And it was all made possible without tapping into taxpayer dollars—the LWCF is funded from a portion of offshore oil and gas revenues. Last year, the state of Wyoming received over $800,000 in LWCF funding for outdoor recreation projects.

Our Wyoming delegation should support reauthorizing and fully funding this popular program. I encourage everyone to voice their support for the Land and Water Conservation Fund, because we all benefit in one way or another.

NICK DOBRIC, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, Dubois

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