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Editor: 

On May 1, the Casper Star-Tribune republished an article from Wyofile.com, an online news organization well-known for its liberal views. The headline “Study finds water near fracked gas field disrupts hormones” is certainly an attention getter, a bit like yelling “Fire” in a crowded theater. The first part of the article attempts to give credibility to the original report by “researchers at the University of Missouri and other institutions” generally interpreted in the Wyofile.com article entitled “Endocrine – Disrupting Activities and Organic Contaminants Associated with Oil and Gas Operations in Wyoming Groundwater” (Endocrine report). The article published by a company located in Berlin, Germany (an internet search states that this company publishes over 2,000 articles and 8,000 books per year, all well-vetted I’m sure) was financially supported by Coming Clean Inc., Brattlebare, Vermont, and is available online for $39.95. Within the Endocrine report reference is made nine times to a 2011 preliminary report prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency entitled “Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming.” This report was not peer reviewed and discounted by the EPA after significant factual errors were discovered within it. The EPA then turned the Pavillion Study over to the State of Wyoming’s Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) and Oil & Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC). The final 2016 report, “Pavillion, Wyoming Area Domestic Water Wells Final Report and Palatability Study” prepared by Action, Mickelson Environmental Inc. of El Dorado Hills, California, in partnership with the WDEQ, is the most comprehensive study of the Pavillion area currently available and was not even referenced in the Endocrine report. This omission, and multiple references to the discredited preliminary EPA report, should cause any informed person to question the true motives behind the Endocrine report.

The following is a quote from the Endocrine report: “agonist receptor activities were similar across drilling regions and significantly greater than laboratory controls and similar to the agonist activity that we measured in unaffected West Virginia surface water controls, suggesting potential background activity in Wyoming groundwater.” For those taking the time to thoroughly read the Endocrine report, we believe they would find it is rife with technical ambiguities, and nothing of significance was learned, proven or disproven.

ROBERT A. KING, P.E., JIMMY E. GOOLSBY, Ph.D., Casper 

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