The looming topic of reclassification was not discussed as its committee did not meet during Tuesday’s Wyoming High School Activities Association Board of Directors meeting.

However, the board did have updated projection enrollment numbers for 2018-20, which is what the committee would use to divide volleyball, basketball and track classifications. If confirmed, the new system would adopt a 16-16-16-rest format by enrollment numbers.

Those numbers indicated Class 4A would be split to include Star Valley, Riverton and Cody while Powell and Lander would be the biggest schools in 3A. The 3A-2A split would occur between Big Piney and Glenrock, and Lusk would be the smallest 2A school while Saratoga and Cokeville would be 1A.

The reclassification committee will reconvene in the future after the proposal passed a final reading by a 13-4 vote at the previous board meeting back in April.

That was the most notable event in the first meeting of the school year that could see significant changes by its end.

“It’s exciting to face these new challenges,” new WHSAA President Ty Flock, of Greybull, said to start the meeting.

After another year of unfavorable weather, the board discussed specifications regarding the state golf meets. They concluded the need to specify wording as host sites for those state meets have split bills with competing teams for utilities such as range balls and practice round fees. It was adjusted that those costs be on the sites as part of the host proposal process.

Soccer was also discussed in a few forms by the WHSAA handbook committee, as it looked for a better way to cut travel during the soccer season.

Reclassification for soccer passed at the last meeting (10-5) as well to include the 14 largest teams in 4A and the rest in 3A. That has posed an issue regarding the remaining 11 programs for 3A in terms of scheduling. The committee elected to wait to make any tweaks to the 2019 season until at least the November meetings.

A proposal to implement clocks at all Class 3A soccer matches passed by a 10-4 vote.

Changing the start date to the basketball and wrestling seasons was also proposed on Tuesday. It was made clear to the board that the proposal did not extend the season, but change the first contact practice date. That would allow larger teams time to have try-outs before preparing for their seasons. It also would insure an adequate number of practices for teams that would have not had enough practices due to weather cancellations.

That would allow teams to start practice two weeks earlier, which would mean early-mid November.

The board was somewhat split on that topic, but after further discussion, and including wrestling in the start date, the proposal passed its first read by a 12-4 vote. It was affirmed among the board that if it would be allowed for Class 4A schools, then it would be allowed for all schools.

Non-conference football scheduling was also revisited to analyze if the goals of the committee were indeed met. As a group, they expressed interest in moving to a two-year cycle for scheduling, which would allow more notice to schedule games and insure a home-and-home series in the non-conference. This year had more open dates than ever because of various complications that allowed coaches to schedule their non-conference games for the first time.

Riverside principal Tony Anson and football coach Sam Buck opened the meeting with an appeal that would make Riverside postseason eligible this year. The committee pushed their decision back to Wednesday.

The Rebels are 2-2 this year and are currently under a 2-year probation because they opted to play down with enrollment numbers higher than a few Class 1A/11-Man schools. Riverside started the year with 11 players on roster but now only have nine healthy.

Follow sports reporter Brady Oltmans on Twitter @Brady_CST

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Brady Oltmans reports on high school and local sports. He joined the Star-Tribune in July 2016 after covering prep sports and college soccer in Nebraska. He also contributes to University of Wyoming sports coverage. He and his dog live in Casper.

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