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This week on our film podcast 'Just to be Nominated,' it's a bonus episode about theaters reopening... and MORE!
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This week on our film podcast 'Just to be Nominated,' it's a bonus episode about theaters reopening... and MORE!

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As a little Labor Day weekend treat we thought we'd put together a quick little bonus episode of Jared, Chris and Bruce talking about theaters reopening, along with assorted stray thoughts about a random assortment of other movie-related things.

If you've heard the show before, you know the kind of tangents we go off on, and if you haven't heard the show before, well, we hope you like what you hear and go on back into the archives to check out our previous shows.

There won't be any links in the show notes because this wasn't that kind of episode, but we'll be back next week with a whole show about conspiracy thrillers so make sure you're subscribed to us where you subscribe to things (there are some hand links down below) and we'll see you then!

Just to be Nominated is hosted and produced by Chris Lay, the podcast operations manager for Lee, along with Bruce Miller, the editor of the Sioux City Journal, and Jared McNett, a reporter for the Globe Gazette in Mason City, Iowa.

You can subscribe on iTunesSpotifyGoogle PodcastsStitcher, or wherever you prefer to listen to your shows.

This week on our film podcast 'Just to be Nominated,' it's a bonus episode about theaters reopening... and MORE!

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