Install a farmhouse sink
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Install a farmhouse sink

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diy-sink-20200622

A farmhouse sink is a good choice for today’ s more casual homes designed with informal open kitchens that extend into a family room.

With no indoor plumbing in early rural kitchens, water was hauled inside in a bucket and poured into a farmhouse sink, with a large apron front, designed to hold a lot of water. It’s a good choice for today’s more casual homes designed with informal open kitchens that extend into a family room. Because it is large it’s often used to bathe a baby or small dog as well as wash large pots and pans.

A plumber will charge $2,010, including labor and material, to install a 30-inch porcelain apron front single bowl farmhouse sink. A handy homeowner with plumbing tools and experience can do the job for $1,800, the cost of the sink and faucet. To install one in an existing kitchen you need to adjust the countertop and possibly the base cabinet to accommodate the wider and deeper apron sink. It is heavier, too, so take that into consideration. In a new kitchen you can use the guidelines suggested by the manufacturer.

To find more DIY and contractor project costs and to post comments and questions, visit www.diyornot.com.

Pro Cost — DIY Cost — Pro time — DIY Time — DIY Savings — Percent Saved

$2,010 — $1,800 — 5.2 — 8.0 — $210 — 10%

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