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Install a screen door
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Install a screen door

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A screen door is a good investment in making life at home more comfortable.

If you can’t open a door to enjoy a nice natural breeze because of unwanted bugs and insects from invading your home, install a screen door to allow a flow of air while protecting against unwanted pests. That free airflow will help lower your air conditioning bill, even if you open the house in the morning and late in the day. A screen door is a good investment in making life at home more comfortable.

You’ll find vinyl screen doors in a variety of styles - in standard 32- and 36-inch widths and 80 inches high - sold at home centers and lumber yards. And they’re maintenance-free, so they’re a nice alternative to wood or aluminum.

Check out the doorjamb to see that it is solid and square, and if any minor repair work is needed to fill old door holes or damage.

A carpenter will charge $303, including labor and material, to replace an old screen door with a standard-size new one. A handy homeowner with carpentry experience and tools can buy the door for $160, install it and save 47% by doing it alone. For a custom-cut door or if the jamb needs to be rebuilt, consider hiring a pro for the best results. No matter who does the job, take the time to repair and paint the doorjamb after the old door is removed, and before the new one is installed.

To find more DIY project costs and to post comments and questions, visit www.diyornot.com.

Pro Cost — DIY Cost — Pro time — DIY Time — DIY Savings — Percent Saved

$303 — $160 — 2.7 — 4.0 — $143 — 47%

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