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Cynthia M. Lummis

U.S. Rep. Cynthia M. Lummis speaks during a 2014 press conference in Cheyenne. Several sources say she is weighing a run at the Senate seat being vacated by Mike Enzi.

Former Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis is seriously weighing a bid to replace outgoing Sen. Mike Enzi in the 2020 elections, several sources told the Star-Tribune this week.

Lummis, who left office in 2016, has been considered a reluctant option to fill Enzi’s position. Despite her legislative pedigree and proven success in Wyoming, Lummis still has several active business interests in the state, as well as young grandchildren and a ranch to look after.

However, since Enzi announced his retirement last week, the four-term congresswoman has received “numerous” calls from former colleagues in Washington urging her to run, her former Chief of Staff Tucker Fagan told the Star-Tribune on Thursday, which Lummis appears to be taking seriously.

She’s had a lot of stuff on her plate, and she’s working through those. And she’s not done yet,” said Fagan. “But I know she is getting calls from people in Congress saying ‘hey, if Enzi’s going out, you should take it seriously.’ And she’s doing that. She’s mulling her business, family, lifestyle and the possibility of a run.”

Though several years removed from her last campaign, Lummis is still poised to mount a campaign in 2020. Lummis’ campaign committee is still active with the Federal Elections Committee and, according to recent financial disclosures, still has roughly $122,000 in cash on hand.

“I was fully expecting we were getting ready to wind that bad boy up and donate the rest of the money out,” said Bill Cubin, a longtime GOP consultant in Wyoming and treasurer for Lummis’ campaign. “Then this happened.”

Lummis’ consideration of a run raises the possibility of a primary showdown against Wyoming’s current U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney, who is heavily rumored to be considering a bid for Enzi’s Senate seat. Cheney challenged Enzi in 2014 but dropped out before the election.

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According to a report in Politico this week, members of the U.S. Senate have been urging Cheney, two-term congresswoman and a House committee chair to run for Enzi’s place in the upper chamber. With roughly one year to go before the filing deadline, Cheney, so far, has been mum on her future plans.

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“Liz believes that this time should be about honoring Sen. Enzi’s lifetime of service to Wyoming and thanking him for all that he’s done for our state,” Cheney’s Chief of Staff Kara Ahern said in response to a request for comment from the Star-Tribune earlier this week.

A Cheney-Lummis matchup would present an interesting quandary for Wyoming’s conservatives. Lummis, considered a strong libertarian voice by Republican insiders in Washington, presents a stark contrast to the foreign policy of Cheney, whose interventionist views strongly resemble those of her father, former Vice President Dick Cheney.

Both also have widespread name recognition and maintain the deep grassroots networks across the state that are needed to mount an effective campaign.

“Both candidates have name recognition. They both have the track record. So yeah, it’s going to be very interesting to see how that plays out,” Fagan said.

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Follow politics reporter Nick Reynolds on Twitter @IAmNickReynolds

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Politics Reporter

Nick Reynolds covers state politics and policy. A native of Central New York, he has spent his career covering governments big and small, and several Congressional campaigns. He graduated from the State University of New York at Brockport in 2015.

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