US tried to take out another Iranian leader, but failed
breaking AP

US tried to take out another Iranian leader, but failed

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The U.S. military tried, but failed, to take out another senior Iranian commander on the same day that an American airstrike killed the Revolutionary Guard's top general, U.S. officials said Friday.

The officials said a military airstrike targeted Abdul Reza Shahlai, a high-ranking commander in Iran's Islamic Republican Guard Corps but the mission was not successful. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity in order to discuss a classified mission.

Officials said both Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani and Shahlai were on approved military targeting lists, which indicates a deliberate effort by the U.S. to cripple the leadership of Iran's Quds force, which has been designated a terror organization by the U.S.

A U.S. drone strike on Jan. 3 killed Soleimani shortly after he landed at Baghdad International Airport. Trump administration officials have justified the killing as an act of self-defense, saying he was planning military acts that threatened large numbers of American military and diplomatic officials in the Middle East. Iran, however, called the attack an act of terrorism, and on Jan. 8 it launched more than a dozen ballistic missiles at two bases in Iraq that house American and coalition forces. No one was killed in that retaliation.

Shahlai

Screen capture from a U.S. State Department "Wanted" poster. The State Department offered a $15 million reward last month for information leading to Shahlai.

The State Department has offered a reward of $15 million for information leading to the disruption of IRGC finances, including Shahlai, a key financier in the organization. The State Department said he "has a long history of targeting Americans and U.S. allies globally," and planned multiple assassinations of coalition forces in Iraq. It said that his activities included providing weapons and explosives to Shia militia groups and directing a plot to assassinate the Saudi ambassador in Washington, D.C., in 2011.

The Pentagon declined to discuss the highly-classified operation.

"We have seen the report of a January 2 airstrike in Yemen, which is long-understood as a safe space for terrorists and other adversaries to the United States. The Department of Defense does not discuss alleged operations in the region," said Navy Cdr. Rebecca Rebarich, a Pentagon spokeswoman.

The Washington Post first reported the development.

Mideast update: Latest news from Iran and Iraq

Read on for more about simmering tensions between the U.S., Iran and Iraq.

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